Ag Teacher's Resource Guide  
     
AG TEACHER'S RESOURCE GUIDE TABLE OF CONTENTS      
Use the links below to navigate to each section of the Agriculture Teacher's Resource Guide.


SECTION 1: GETTING THE POSITION / TRANSITIONING POSITIONS      
The search process can be hectic and at times intimidating; and the desire to get it over with can lead to hurried interviews, snap decisions, and missed opportunities. Taking the time to plan and ask useful questions to the appropriate people are key to navigating the application, interview, and hiring process.

SECTION 2: ORIENTATION TO THE SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY      
To quote the Broadway show The Music Man, “You’ve gotta know the territory!” New instructors need a working knowledge of the school’s people and places when seeking assistance throughout the year.

SECTION 3: STARTING RIGHT      
Your first weeks of teaching won’t be easy, but they can be exciting and rewarding—if you’re prepared. Task management, organization, realistic expectations and a positive attitude will go a long way.

SECTON 4: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT      
Each state education department typically has set course descriptions used by agricultural education instructors. In addition, each school will have specific policies and procedures for curriculum development, be sure to check with your school administration.

SECTION 5: TEACHING      
At last, you’re in command of a classroom. Good teaching is not a “power trip,” however. Be sure to pay constant attention to observing, evaluating and improving your teaching. Teaching is both an art and a science. The following information aims to help you better prepare to deliver high quality instruction which engages your students in working toward meeting established learning outcomes.

SECTION 6: ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING      
One of the most challenging parts of being a teacher is assessing student learning. How do you ensure that a student is learning? What systems should be put in place?

SECTION 7: CLASSROOM AND LABORATORY MANAGEMENT      
Students won’t learn much if others in the class are disruptive or if they are confused about your expectations for behavior, classroom policies and/or procedures. Make sure you manage your classroom for students’—and your own—success. Your classroom management policy and procedures must comply with school administration parameters for appropriate action. Be certain to familiarize yourself with current school policies and procedures.

SECTION 8: LEADERSHIP THROUGH STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS      
One of the most exciting parts about being an agricultural educator is watching students grow and find their passions. For many students, this often comes when they are involved in a student leadership organization, such as the National FFA Organization.

SECTION 9: SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE      
Supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs are teacher-supervised, individualized, hands-on, student-developed activities that give students real-world experience directly applicable to careers in the broad fields of agriculture. An SAE may involve student ownership of an agriculture-related enterprise or placement in an agriculture-related job, either at a job site or in a school agriculture laboratory. SAEs will be unique and vital components of your agricultural education program, and your role in guiding and supporting students is an important one.

SECTION 10: WORKING WITH SCHOOL PARTNERS      
Ideally, your administrators, guidance counselors and school board members are personable, visionary, committed leaders who support, promote and defend your program throughout the school system and community. But even if reality is far from this ideal, it is vital to your program and your career that you develop and maintain effective relationships with these decision makers.

SECTION 11: WORKING WITH COLLEAGUES      
To succeed in your career, you need respect, assistance and cooperation from fellow teachers and other school staff. You will be called on to work with other teachers on school and professional committees, teaching teams and student organization events. You will also informally interact with colleagues to guide specific students, juggle schedules and share equipment and facilities. Establishing effective professional relationships will smooth your path to career success.

SECTION 12: COMMUNICATING WITH CAREGIVERS, PARENTS, AND GUARDIANS      
Students whose Caregivers/Parents/Guardians are involved in and supportive of their education have much greater chances of school and “real world” success. Young people may not do much to invite their Caregivers/Parents/Guardians’ involvement, so it’s up to you to reach out and find ways to bring them into the educational process.

SECTION 13: WORKING WITH BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY PARTNERS      
Your local business community will be very important to you and your agriculture program. Members of the business community can be your program’s advisors, benefactors, advocates and partners—as well as the “consumers” of your final product, career-ready students. Becoming familiar with and to members of the business community could be vital to your success.

SECTION 14: DEVELOPING AND MANAGING AN ADVISORY COMMITTEE      
An advisory committee is a group of business, industry, community and school-related people who help you keep your program on track. With appropriate management, it can provide both guidance and support. Use your committee and its members to help you develop, design and deliver a quality program.

SECTION 15: ENGAGING VOLUNTEERS      
"If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." The best way to grow your agricultural education program is to engage volunteers in your local community.

SECTION 16: MARKETING YOUR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION PROGRAM      
Our programs are often one of the best kept secrets in a school district. If we are going to change that, it becomes imperative for us to develop and consistently employ marketing mechanisms. Who we market to along with the how and why we market to them must be identified. How we market and why we market. Your stakeholders will only know what’s going on in your program if you share it with them through the course of your marketing activities. Marketing the positive things happening in your program, to your stakeholders, is one of the best tools that agriculture teachers have at their disposal, that can be used to grow and ensure program survival.

SECTION 17: PROFESSIONALISM      
The image you project and the success of your program will depend, in part, on your own commitment to professionalism and personal development. As a role model for students, you need to “walk the talk”—to practice the same high standards of ethics, professionalism, goal setting, leadership and coping skills you expect from students.

SECTION 18: PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT      
Your agricultural education program will consist of three major components—classroom and related instruction, a Supervised Agricultural Experience program for each student and an FFA chapter. To develop a successful pro-gram, bind the thee components together with a clear mission for your program and yourself as a teacher.

   
 
     
 
   

 
     
 
     
 
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